Wonderful walnuts

Walnuts are a wonderful health-giving and nutritious snack. They provide protein, slow-release energy, potassium, magnesium, copper, zinc, and vitamins B6 and E. The oil contained in walnuts is very special. There is seven times more polyunsaturated fat than saturated fat. This in conjunction with the antioxidant properties of walnuts makes them an ideal treatment for anyone with heart, circulatory, high blood pressure and cholesterol problems.

Spanish and American scientists have discovered that eating a handful of walnuts a day significantly lowers cholesterol levels.

Engraved clay tablets dating from 2,000 B.C. showed walnuts growing in the hanging gardens of Babylon! And the Greeks and Romans treated them as a royal food. The most widely grown variety is the English walnut. I well remember my dad cracking walnuts at Christmastime, when I was a little girl. Add them to your shopping list this week…

Tomatoes

Tomatoes were introduced to Europe by the Spaniards in the sixteenth century. They are rich in antioxidants, especially carotenoids such as betacarotene and lycopene. They contain vitamins C and E, and so protect the heart, the circulatory system and the body against cancer. They are low in sodium and high in potassium, thus are helpful with conditions such as high blood pressure and fluid retention.

Canned tomatoes lose very little of their nutritional value, so always keep some in the larder. The lycopene contained in tomatoes protects men against prostate cancer. Tinned tomatoes, tomato sauce, tomato ketchup and sun-dried tomatoes are all important nutritionally. They protect men and women against heart disease. I love cherry tomatoes! So much nicer than sweets!

Seeds

I have pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds on my breakfast each morning. In addition to nuts, cereals and pulses, seeds contain protein. They are a good source of vitamins E and B, and are full of dietary fibre. This is great for keeping the bowels regular.

Seeds make a useful contribution to soups, salads and casseroles. They are also a great snack when you are out and about.

Pumpkin seeds contain iron for healthy blood, magnesium for maintaining healthy cells and zinc for growth and development. Zinc aids the immune system, too.

Sunflower seeds are a useful source of vitamin E and an acid known as linoleic. This is necessary for the maintenance of cell membranes.

Sesame seeds contain vitamin E and calcium.

Sweet potatoes

I got into sweet potatoes big-time when we lived in the States. They are very popular in the Caribbean, and date back a long way. Indeed, Columbus brought them to Europe, and you will find them in every supermarket in England now.

Sweet potatoes contain starch, which is energy. They provide some protein, vitamin C, vitamin E and a huge amount of carotenoids, including betacarotene. They are considered to be strong in combating cancer.

Sweet potatoes are delicious in homemade juice. Try combining apple, celery, carrot and sweet potato.

Mashing this delicious vegetable with others, such as ordinary potatoes, parsnips or swede, is a great way to introduce them to children. Get them organically grown if you can.

Raspberries

Raspberries are a very rich source of vitamin C which is essential for healthy skin, bones and teeth. This vitamin supports the immune system and is also an antioxidant. Vitamin C may prevent certain cancers.

Raspberries contain vitamin E, folate and fibre, too. Raspberry juice cleanses and detoxifies the digestive system, and helps with fevers and cystitis. Raspberry vinegar is used as a gargle for sore throats, while raspberry leaf tea is a tonic for the female reproductive system. Many women drink raspberry leaf tea at the onset of labour. It is believed to assist contractions, and make delivery easier.

Do buy organic!

 

Pumpkin seeds

Pumpkin pie was a big treat when we lived in the States!

Pumpkin seeds contain amino acids, calcium, essential fatty acids, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, zinc, vitamins A,C and E. You can put them on your cereal in the morning, as I do. They are super helpful for any bladder problems, and troubles with the prostate gland in men.. The reason they are so helpful for prostatitis is down to their abundance in zinc. Pumpkin oil can alternatively be taken in capsule form.

The flesh of the pumpkin is widely used in Europe, the U.S.A., Australia, Africa and the Caribbean. It is a rich source of beta carotene, which the body converts into vitamin A.

Snacking on seeds and nuts is essential for vegetarians.You can be sure that you are getting iron for healthy blood, magnesium for maintaining healthy body cells, and zinc for normal growth and development, when you include pumpkin seeds in your diet.

Perfect pears

We have a pear tree in the back garden. The blossom is just beautiful in the Spring, and the fruit is delicious in the Autumn.The pears are of the Conference variety, which I love. I enjoy the crunch! Many people prefer Sweet Williams because they are softer and more golden. The best way to ensure that you are eating organic food which is packed with prana (life-force) is to pick it from your own garden and consume immediately.

Pears are a good source of the soluble fibre pectin. This helps to regulate bowel function, and increases the amount of cholesterol eliminated by the body. Pears contain vitamins A,C and E. They also contain potassium, which prevents cramp during exercise. Dried pears make an excellent snack which contains significant amounts of iron. Convalescents find pears easy to digest and wonderfully restorative.